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Incomers from the north turned out to be educators and carriers of genes across Southeast Asia

An international group of researchers with the participation of Pavel Flegontov from the Institute for Information Transmission Problems (aka Kharkevich Institute) of the Russian Academy of Sciences conducted DNA studies of South-East Asian residents in order to clarify the history of the settlement of the region. They managed to identify several waves of migrants in the last 50,000 years. The corresponding article is published in Science.
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Researchers studied DNA taken from the remains of 18 people of Southeast Asia who lived between 4,400 and 1,700 years ago. It was established that the inhabitants of the Mien Bac region (modern Vietnam), who lived there about four thousand years ago at the end of the (local) Neolithic period, had two ancestral groups — hunters and gatherers from East Eurasia of the Paleolithic period, and farmers who lived on the territory of modern southern China, but only moderately related to modern Han Chinese. The second wave of settlers, which arrived at the beginning of the Bronze Age, made the majority of the local population descendants of the Austronesian peoples who came from the territory in the south of modern China.

The authors draw parallels between the two waves of migration to the region and similar processes in Western Europe. There were also two major migrations. First, the farmers from the Middle East moved here in the Neolithic (people who inhabited Europe before that did not know agriculture), and the second one, later in the Bronze Age — the invasion of the Indo-European tribes.

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